The History of English

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This topic contains 6 replies, has 4 voices, and was last updated by  twentynine 4 years, 5 months ago.

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  • #15805

    Chris
    Participant

    It must be said that there are some great podcasts out there that really get into the nitty-gritty of a subject in an interesting and engrossing way…….and this is one of them that captures the imagination of its listeners. This podcast is highly recommended for anyone wanting to learn more about, you guessed it, the history of the English language. It is so much more than that, but don't just take my word for it. Give it a go, it really is an interesting podcast that offers more than just isolated pockets of history about the language that 3 billion people (as native and a second language) speak today.  This story encompasses a host of pivotal elements that when combined provide a detail view of how one language split into many different languages including Germanic, Hellenic, Celtic, Italic, Indo-Iranian, Anatolian, Albanian etc. which are all related and come from the same (dead) langauge, the Indo-European langauge. Yes, French, Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Icelandic, Danish, Swedish, Romanian, German, Welsh, Irish and Scottish Gaelic are all cousins as are Bengali, Punjabi, Hindi, Persian, Kurdish, Latvian, Russian, Polish, Czech, Slovakian, Bulgarian and Armenian are also cousins and too related to what we call Modern English. The podcast is ultimately a history podcast. The host, Kevin Stroud, provides us with a base history and uses different tools to explain how certain transitional shifts occurred between languages  by way of explaining these in easy to understand terms comparing specific words from different languages to each other, for example: pita (Sanskrit)


    > pater (Latin)


    > fadar (Gothic)


    > father (English). This is just the tip of the iceberg.
    "The History of English podcast is dedicated to the exploration of the history of the English language.  Beginning with the Indo-European origins of the language, Kevin Stroud explores the evolution of the language from an obscure Germanic dialect to the modern international language we have today."The main website is here: http://historyofenglishpodcast.podbean.com/ or here: http://historyofenglishpodcast.com/index.htmlOr, on iTunes here: https://itunes.apple.com/gb/podcast/history-of-english-podcast/id538608536Will be interesting to see what other people think (I spent half an hour explaining this to Alex (Frenchie) in one of our local pubs today after several beers).Enjoy  :)

  • #18916

    twentynine
    Participant

    Oh yes. He did.

  • #18917

    Chris
    Participant

    Oh yes. He did.

    But in a good way I hope. One of the few times I did all the talking for that last half hour.....must have been a strange feeling for you  ;)

  • #18918

    twentynine
    Participant

    But in a good way I hope. One of the few times I did all the talking for that last half hour.....must have been a strange feeling for you  ;)

    I admit it was a bit weird. I'm not used to being the quiet one. ;DI did enjoy it though. Was fun to be on the other end of a lecture. And you convinced me. I've subscribed to the podcast and have the first 4 episodes on my ipod. I'll let you know what i think of them next time we meet and will try to remember to post my thoughts in this thread. I have high hopes though.Well played.Alex

  • #18919

    anonymous
    Participant

    Yup, this is my other favorite podcast right now!  Glad you're enjoying it too :)

  • #18920

    anonymous
    Participant

    I really enjoy this podcast. There was an old BBC series that went into the history of the language but I'm totally getting into Kevin's work. It's obvious that he's very enthusiastic about history and English. I like his approach to English and the root languages as 'spoken artifacts'. A great way to look at the language. Coming from the north of England I'm pretty aware of the impact on accents that the Norse and Germanic tribes had on the language but I wasn't as aware of the Indo-European stuff. Gripping!

  • #18921

    twentynine
    Participant

    Yeah. It's good.Not easy though. Despite trying to avoid making it a podcast about language rather than history there is a lot of grammer and linguistics involved. It can get heavy.Well worth it though. Very rewarding and will surprise you with the similarities between languages you would never imagine being related.

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