Suzanne

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This topic contains 7 replies, has 4 voices, and was last updated by  anonymous 4 years, 9 months ago.

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  • #15810

    anonymous
    Participant

    Hi all!I'm Suzanne, Australian by birth, but have been living in California for my entire adult life.  In my real life, I write bioinformatics software (with degrees in both chemistry and computer science), but for the past decade or so, much of what I read for pleasure  is British medieval history, both fiction and non-fiction.  I've been listening to the BHP for several months now, but have only now finally caught up (I've also listened to the entire History of Rome podcast, and for a while was trying to keep the two podcasts in sync, time-wise, which slowed me down a fair bit!) -- I desperately need more content, so I just became a member!I took the family to England (and France) for a couple of weeks this past summer (their first time, my second) -- we certainly didn't get to see everything I would have liked to see, but we saw a lot, with somewhat of an emphasis on medieval sites, and had a wonderful time.Just scoping out the introductions from the past few months, it seems this crowd leans rather young and male (I'm mid-40's, w/ 3  teen/tween kids, and clearly not male), so I hope I don't feel too out of place, but heck, you can be whatever you want on the internet, right?  ;)

  • #18932

    Chris
    Participant

    Welcome to the forum Suzanne.I hope you don't feel too much out of place here, we're all friendly  :)I don't know what the ratio is but there are quite a lot of female members, just depends if they ever wrote an introduction or if they have been on the forum lately. Ok, I'm not female but I don't fall into the young category (pushing 40 so at least I don't feel young from time to time) if that helps  ;)Have any of your kids been listening to the podcast? Do they share an interest in British history?

  • #18933

    Jamie
    Keymaster

    Yeah, I'll echo what Chris said.  Actually, something I'm rather proud of is that I'm closing in on 50/50 on female to male listeners/members (which is pretty cool, considering many other history podcasts have a 20 to 1 ratio of men to women).As for age demographics, it's a pretty wide swath.  But we're all pretty young at heart.  ;)Anyway, welcome to the forums!

  • #18934

    anonymous
    Participant

    Thanks, Chris and Jamie — I do actually feel welcome (was kind of kidding about not fitting in, was just kind of surprised to see all the introductions from students, given that I had very little interest in history back when I was a student, and this would probably have been the last place I would have been hanging out!  Of course the internet was a much smaller place back then…). Unfortunately, none of my kids listen to the podcast (they actually don't listen to any podcasts -- it's something I do to keep myself motivated to go on walks).  A few years ago, when I could cajole my eldest to go on walks with me, I used to regale her with stories of the Plantagenet kings, but that was apparently a temporary thing.  I've never been able to get any of them to read any history or historical fiction (they pretty much only read fantasy).  My two girls do seem interested in learning about history when someone tells them interesting stories or tidbits, and in school (depending...), so I'm sure they'd enjoy the podcast if it were imposed upon them in small doses  ;) but it's not something they'd seek out. 

  • #18935

    anonymous
    Participant

    Hi Welcome to the community. I think you should find that this is one of the friendliest groups around. I had never even thought about the demographics of the audience. I just enjoyed the top quality podcast, and the friendly chat. It was eye opening when we all met in London. I had sort of expected us all to be a fairly socially inept group of older males, but instead there was a great mix of age and gender almost all of whom were completely normal (if meeting in a pub and talking history is ever normal!) I've never understood why people focus on gender, to me it is mostly irrelevant; people are people and enjoy what they enjoy. I think that history is something we all start interested in, with kings, battles, castles, horses, drama etc, then school finds a special way to beat the interest out of us. If that hasn't completely killed the interest, the last sparks are usually put out in further/higher education. Kids just don't find it an easy  subject, and don't find it cool, and especially hate anything that seems old fashioned. Luckily I think that the spark can easily return. I was dreadful at history at school, but looking back that is actually because I had dreadful teachers and course materials. I spent years learning about seed drills and Newcommen engines and the distribution of coal, and why gin was the scourge of the Victorian poor. I was aware from my family trips that there were castles, kings, abbeys, navies, cannon etc, but those seemed to never, ever appear at school. I used to think it was that I didn't get history, but as I got older I realised that my history education was poor and stifling. So I have binged ever since; podcasts (History of Rome, Jamie, When Diplomacy Fails, The Ancient World, Dan Carlin's Hardcore History), visits, museums, books (anything from Roman history to naval history, to Papal history, to disease, warfare, Jared Diamond, Saul David, Keegan, Churchill etc).So hold out hope for your kids, when they hit 30-40 like us they might be normal history buffs too!

  • #18936

    Chris
    Participant

    I think that history is something we all start interested in, with kings, battles, castles, horses, drama etc, then school finds a special way to beat the interest out of us. If that hasn't completely killed the interest, the last sparks are usually put out in further/higher education. Kids just don't find it an easy  subject, and don't find it cool, and especially hate anything that seems old fashioned. Luckily I think that the spark can easily return. I was dreadful at history at school, but looking back that is actually because I had dreadful teachers and course materials.

    I can relate to that. I was the same. I hated history at school simply because it was so boring. There never seemed to be any spark in the way it was presented and taught; very stagnant but not always the teachers fault as they had to then (and still do now) have to work within a remit and that usually involved a stilted syllabus that no one was interested in. I don't what history lessons kids are being taught today but to make history interesting you definitely have to make it fun.

  • #18937

    anonymous
    Participant

    Actually, I've been reasonably impressed w/ the history education my kids have been getting in school.  There's not a lot of ancient history (6th and 7th grade covers ancient Mesopotamia through to Renaissance, and then they never see it again), and (perhaps understandably) there's a huge amount of US History (the Revolution was covered in depth in 5th grade, again in 8th grade, and then more briefly in 11th grade), but they do a pretty good job of engaging the kids.  In my eldest daughter's classes (currently in 11th grade), the last couple of years have put a lot of emphasis on current events, which, while not exactly history, they do relate it to history, and it makes it all more relevant to the kids.  I have to admit though, it makes me feel old to have my kid studying historical events (like the end of the Cold War) that hadn't even happened yet when I was in HS!

  • #18938

    anonymous
    Participant

    Hee hee, I worry that I was born in a world before mobile phones and mass market desktop PC's, whilst my kids will have communication devices implanted directly into their minds. They will have Minority Report style computers and the idea that there was a time before the world wide web will seem like hearing that the Romans had chariot races – simply ancient!!

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