Sixty Six Discussion Thread

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This topic contains 20 replies, has 7 voices, and was last updated by  Chris 5 years, 4 months ago.

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  • #15534

    Jamie
    Keymaster

    Ok, it looks like there is consensus for Sixty Six, which can be found on Netflix, etc. so I thought I'd take the initiative and start a discussion thread.

  • #17925

    Jamie
    Keymaster

    By the way, is everyone happy with Chris's Guidelines?  If I get a couple “ok's” and no “that's an awful idea!” I'll post them up as a Sticky topic at the top of the subforum.Also, wish granted... Film Club has it's own forum.  :)

  • #17926

    anonymous
    Participant

    Hmmm my Internet connection is way to crap to download films (hey I live in South London and we only have stuff the Victorians built, or that could be made from cheap concrete in the 1970s). Might need to head to 2nd hand DVD shop to tack this down

  • #17927

    Anonymous

    I've seen the film, not sure when it is ok to start the discussion….today is the first day of the last week of May.  Are we ready or do some need more time?

  • #17928

    Chris
    Participant

    I only added this film to my LoveFilm queue a couple of days ago and luckily it just came through the post so I will be able to watch it at the weekend.I don't think it matters if we are a little late on the schedule (especially as one hasn't been agreed upon yet).People might need a few more days to get a copy a watch it. Might I suggest everyone let the group know if you need more time so we can work out when to start our discussion?  ;)

  • #17929

    anonymous
    Participant

    I plan to watch it this weekend.  I am looking forward to having the time to devote to something besides work.

  • #17930

    Chris
    Participant

    By the end of the weekend that will be three people who will have watched the movie……it's a start  :)Need to see if the others who liked the sound of it are able to get a copy and watch it. I will send PM and find out.

  • #17931

    anonymous
    Participant

    Alright, I watched the movie this morning — ready for discussions to start!

  • #17932

    JJ
    Participant

    I had already seen the movie and really enjoyed it, even my 12 year old son liked it.

  • #17933

    Chris
    Participant

    Okie dokie, looks like some of you have seen Sixty Six. I hope most of you have managed to watch it over the last few days. If you haven't, fear not, watch it when you can and join in the discussion here later. There really isn't a rigid set of guidelines for this. Just bear in mind that if you haven't seen the film yet but are interested in doing so….......do not read the posts in this thread as it WILL contain spoilers!!! And we don't want to ruin it for you  ;)There are no hard and fast rules, just say what you thought about the film.....be honest. I hope you all enjoyed it.Let's get this discussion going then  8)

  • #17934

    Chris
    Participant

    I'll start things off. I'll keep things simple so we can develop the discussion later.Frankly, I wasn't too sure to begin with, as there is a strong football theme in the film, that I would like it simply because I don't like football. However, saying that, I did enjoy Fever Pitch and that was a pretty good film so I thought what the heck I'm going to watch it, especially as it was chosen as the first film in the film club. To be honest, I wasn't at all disappointed. I thought this was a thoroughly entertaining and quite well-written film that throws in plenty of comic moments. Everything about this film was typically British and that's what I liked about it, especially the intricacies of the bar mitzvah and the insane amount of preparation that goes into making it successful. Obviously, the World Cup story line was central to how sport can have a massive impact on people's lives even if it means, in this one particular instance, ruining someone else's. How bar mitzvahs were portrayed in the sixties in contrast to the immensity of England winning the World Cup was like a tug-of-war between the two and on one side you have the main character Bernie, who at an incredibly important time in his life is being shunned by friends and family for something that should come secondary to those His parents, Esther and Manny are both very likable characters as are his aunt Lila and uncle Jimmy, all for different reasons. My favourite character, the blind Rabbi, was central to Bernie's big day and there were some funny moments between the two, which to me, along with his parent's realization that Bernie has throughout his life been shunned, living in the shadow of his older brother, were among the best scenes in the entire film. The best for me, however, was the moment father and son shared at the end of the film whilst watching England score the final and winning goal at Wembley where Bernie seemed truly happy; that was the pinnacle that delivered just what we wanted at the end of a film, a typically, but justifiably, feel-good moment.Also, I thought the use of original 1966 World Cup footage worked very well in the film.So, what does anyone else think?

  • #17935

    anonymous
    Participant

    I just finished watching the movie and really should be off to bed, but thought I would write while the tears are still moist in my eyes.  I loved the movie.  I have never heard of it before.  My husband was a reluctant viewer at first, but he thoroughly enjoyed it, too.  He even managed to watch while a thunderstorm rolled in.  As a psychologist, I loved the relationships in the movie; the brothers (both the main character and his brother as well as Bernie's father and his brother), the relationship Bernie had with the blind rabbi and his asthma doctor (a nice addition, I thought) and the father-son relationship.  Like you, Chris, I thought the highlight was when Bernie's father managed to overcome his OCD and drive (over the speed limit) to Wembley Stadium to catch the tail end of the match.  I liked what Bernie said at the end; that to become a man he learned you had to stop criticizing your father and learn that he is just a man.  Bernie said that he befriended his dad that day and it helped him to become a man.  Well, that is all for now.  I will likely add something to the discussion in the future, but off to bed and back to work.

  • #17936

    anonymous
    Participant

    Excellent first film choice, everyone!  There's just something about a sports-related coming of age story that makes me tear up.  (I bawl my way through Steve Kluger's "The Last Days of Summer" every stinkin' time.)  My heart went out to Bernie because I've been in his shoes, having something very important to me overshadowed by someone/something else.  I think we've all been in his shoes to some degree, honestly.In an effort to avoid doing actual work this morning, I've been on Google reading reviews for the movie.  The New York Times review (http://movies.nytimes.com/2008/08/01/movies/01sixt.html) says that "Like Bernie’s reluctant guests, however, you may find yourself wishing for more of Wembley Stadium and less of the Rubenses’ living room."  Did you find that to be true?  I don't agree with that.  I rather enjoyed being in their living room, if you will.  Fascinating family to watch.  Being based on the director's experiences, I shouldn't be surprised at how real the story felt.  I could have been sitting in the congregation hall listening to an old man ramble on about how his stupid older brother had everything grand but did he? No! No, he had to make do with some old neighbors and a sad cake.  But anyways, the cast pulled it off beautifully.  Especially Bernie's parents.  I'd forgotten that Helena Bonham-Carter was in the movie, so that was a nice surprise. 

  • #17937

    JJ
    Participant

    My husband started watching Sixty Six late one night but stopped it after the first scene, he knew the bleak humor was right up my alley and I would be mad if he watched the movie without me. Being an American and someone who doesn't care much for sports, I didn't know the outcome of the 1966 World Cup which made the lead up to the final game that more exciting.

    In an effort to avoid doing actual work this morning, I've been on Google reading reviews for the movie.  The New York Times review (http://movies.nytimes.com/2008/08/01/movies/01sixt.html) says that "Like Bernie’s reluctant guests, however, you may find yourself wishing for more of Wembley Stadium and less of the Rubenses’ living room."  Did you find that to be true?

    I'm also avoiding work ;). I agree with you, the movie wasn't about the team or the World Cup, that was just the backdrop of the movie.

  • #17938

    Chris
    Participant

    I am glad it was well received, it would have been awful if the first film we had agreed upon turned out to be something no one liked and we all ended up venting over how terrible it was. That would have been a bit of downer so it was great to see positive reviews for a film that, on a low budget but with good writing, acting and direction, can please a few people us herein a new and small film club.

    In an effort to avoid doing actual work this morning, I've been on Google reading reviews for the movie.  The New York Times review (http://movies.nytimes.com/2008/08/01/movies/01sixt.html) says that "Like Bernie’s reluctant guests, however, you may find yourself wishing for more of Wembley Stadium and less of the Rubenses’ living room."  Did you find that to be true? 

    Certainly not!! Ok, I'm not into football but I can appreciate the importance of England winning the World Cup and as JJ said, the film wasn't about the World Cup, that was just the backdrop of the story.  I rather liked the scenes at the Reubens' home and I like the Reubens for who they are. We all have faults and differences of opinions and we certainly all make mistakes so this family isn't different from any other. Apart from the rabbi, having thought about it a little more, I think that the uncle Jimmy character was brilliant. He was very comical with an outgoing personality and so very different from his brother, Manny. The moment when Manny was just about to walk out on everyone and then noticed his injured brother and the shop sign that now included his name (because Manny wasn't a massive failure and was as equally important to the business, and the family, as Jimmy) was a pinnacle moment for Manny, which in turn changed the way he felt and saw things, which eventually in turn brought Manny and his son closer together, sharing that moment, which in retrospect, was far more important than the bar mitzvah itself.A great little moment in great little movie.

  • #17939

    Chris
    Participant

    I too read a couple of reviews and some critics really did not like the movie. I hardly ever listen to critics simply because I think they are overrated and, to be honest, quite annoying (I hope there are no critics here  :- ) and full of themselves. But then I don't know them personally and I am sure they are very nice people ???But honestly, a good or bad review, I tend to use my own judgement and it doesn't fail me too often when it comes to films.I quote: "Sixty Six" may find a niche audience, but instead of depicting a boy's first steps toward manhood -- ceremony aside -- it turns into an uninvolving portrait of self-absorption.Wow! this person saw something completely different to me. Yes, Bernie was very focused on making his special day a success and who wouldn't, it's a big occasion and I am sure most of us would be willing to sacrifice something major (something that pleases or benefits others) to make your own occasion a success. You only have to look at weddings!! But I wouldn't say Bernie was self-absorbed because that would mean he didn't really interact with anyone and this clearly was not the case. Bernie, although quite one track minded, was an intelligent and likable character, or at least I think so.

  • #17940

    anonymous
    Participant

    Ditto that — I didn't get the self-absorption vibe at all from Bernie.  At least nothing more than any child/teenager/bride would be, anyways.  Manny packing up and leaving...  I was so relieved when he got to the shop and Jimmy was hurt.  I thought for sure he was going to go jump off a bridge or something like that. 

  • #17941

    Anonymous

    Self absorption is normal in children and adolescents.  Some say that overcoming self absorption is the definition of attaining adulthood.  Who grew up more?  Bernie?  His dad?I enjoyed the movie immensely and will recommend it to others.

  • #17942

    drewster81
    Participant

    Well, I studied Film Studies and wanted to a film critic so OFFENSE TAKEN. ;)  HeheheI promise, I'll get to watching it tomorrow, I just had a huge weekend with this conference!

  • #17943

    Chris
    Participant

    Manny packing up and leaving...  I was so relieved when he got to the shop and Jimmy was hurt.  I thought for sure he was going to go jump off a bridge or something like that.

    Similar thoughts here, except I thought he was simply running away from all of his problems instead of facing up to them. I don't think he was going to kill himself because he packed his suitcase. His brother having the accident certainly brought him back to reality and the responsibilities he has as a father. Also, the accident not only brought Manny and Bernie closer together but also Jimmy too.

    Self absorption is normal in children and adolescents.  Some say that overcoming self absorption is the definition of attaining adulthood.  Who grew up more?  Bernie?  His dad?I enjoyed the movie immensely and will recommend it to others.

    Very true, although I am sure there are many self-absorbed adults as well. I think both Manny and Bernie experienced something special and it wasn't just about a boy growing up into a man and father overcoming his fears but also along the lines of realizing what they were both missing in their lives and that was the relationship they should be sharing with each other as father and son. Yes, in the literal sense Bernie became a man that day but also I'd like to think that, conversely, Manny also remembered what it was like to have a bit childish fun too.

  • #17944

    Chris
    Participant

    Well, I studied Film Studies and wanted to a film critic so OFFENSE TAKEN. ;)  HeheheI promise, I'll get to watching it tomorrow, I just had a huge weekend with this conference!

    Sorry Drew, thought I got away with that one  ::)I went to Uni in the early 90s on a three year media studies course and it is from those days that I disliked critics.....generally speaking of course  ;)Enjoy the film. Will interested to hear what your thoughts are.

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