Regional Dialects or sayings

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This topic contains 11 replies, has 8 voices, and was last updated by  Midlands Mole 3 years, 6 months ago.

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  • #16019

    anonymous
    Participant

    Kind of history relatedI saw an article this week saying regional dialects in Britain are dying out. So because of that, my question isWhat is your favourite regional saying or word?Mine areGrockle - A south west term for a summer visitor or touristMoider or Mither - a N Wales or northern England term which means to bother/annoy may have come from Welsh Moedrodd to worry/bother

  • #19579

    iain
    Participant

    a radgie gadgie – Northumbrian for an angry man

  • #19580

    anonymous
    Participant

    Familiar with Mither as a Yorkshireman.I lived for a while in the East Midlands so have a mix of favorite regional sayings:Podged - Full of food (East Midlands is where I picked this up)Hanging - Feeling or looking rough (East Midlands is where I picked this up)Ginnel - narrow passage or alleyway (Yorkshire)Owt - Anything (Yorkshire)Thissen - Yourself (Yorkshire)

  • #19581

    anonymous
    Participant

    saw this on a FB group and thought I would share. unfortunately 'what not' is not on the list of phraseshttp://www.lifehack.org/articles/lifestyle/simple-british-slangs-you-probably-should-start-using.html

  • #19582

    Moore
    Participant

    “Going round the wrekin” meaning doing something or going somewhere the long way. When I was younger I thought this was a universal saying until I realised the Wrekin is a huge hill & hill fort next to the A5 (Watling st) in Shropshire that was at one point used as the capital of the Cornovii tribe & its name derives from Celtic for Wrikon. Its a beast to walk to the summit but the reward is spectacular. You can see the Roman city of Virocnium but the Castra at Eaton Constantine (which was used to flush out the celts) is sneakily & purposely hidden from summit view. It must of been some graft for the Romans ascending that hill & routing the Celts.

  • #19583

    anonymous
    Participant

    I used to live in Shropshire and have used 'going round the Wrekin' and I agree when you see the Wrekin you can understand where that phrase comes from.I go along the A5 when I'm coming home to visit family and its the first landmark I see that I know I'm close to home

  • #19584

    Moore
    Participant

    Yes, it's a lovely part of the world. In fact it's lovely going from North of Wolverhampton all the way up the A5 & into Wales. The Black Country has some fantastic sayings & dialects, I was reading that the West Midlands accent is one of the oldest twangs in the country. Brum University have been studying local manuscripts that date back 600 years & tracing the local dialect. Brilliant.

  • #19585

    Chris
    Participant

    Off the top of my head……Crack = gossipGan = goingKecks = trousersNowt = nothingChuddy = chewing gumMush = mouthScran = foodYam = homeSummat = somethingClout = smack or hitVanaye = nearly or almostJust a few words from Cumbria (but not exclusively as I have heard some of these used elsewhere).

  • #19586

    Richard Lyle
    Participant

    You'd be amazed – or maybe you wouldn't – at the number of ways Glaswegians have of saying “drunk.”

  • #19587

    anonymous
    Participant

    RichHL I have a Glaswegian friends so Ive heard a few over the years

  • #19588

    Roger
    Participant

    Thanks Chris, for the list of Cumbrian words. I remember most of those from my boarding school days in Wigton.The school is closed in the mid 1980s, sadly.  :( http://wosa.org.uk/

  • #19589

    Midlands Mole
    Participant

    I am especially fond of the Black Country (roughly the area between wolverhampton and Birmingham) accent and sayings, and lived and worked among it for many years.A lot of people think that the Birmingham accent ( brummie) and Black country are the same but you only make the mistake of saying that to a Black Country resident once. a black country friend told me (and indicated by a pervious poster) that it is the english dialect that is closest to middle english as spoken by chaucer.My fave sayings are : ow bist - How are you?bay too bah - I'm not too badbunny-fire - Bonfire ( my personal fave)bonk - a small hill ( 2nd fave) kaylied - Drunk bostin - very goodbibble - pebble caghanded - left handedsailin' - ceiling yow am - you are (the reason that brummies call black country speakers yam yams)Wassin - throat as it "get it down yer wassin"clack - shut up as in "stop your clack"tararabit - see you later babby - baby All fantastic if you aks (ask) me !

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