Maps of the Eastern Hemisphere (1300 BCE to 1500 CE)

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This topic contains 36 replies, has 2 voices, and was last updated by  Jamie 4 years, 7 months ago.

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    Posts
  • #15811

    Chris
    Participant

    Just in case any one is interested, here are a selection of maps from the Wikimedia Commons website showing the Eastern Hemisphere from the UK to Australia. Wikimedia Commons, for those of you who might not have heard of it before, is a media repository of some 15 million files all of which are freely usuable.The following maps will be embedded from the Wikimedia Commons website in their original size so they will look large but this is deliberate. These maps contain small print in areas and so the larger the map the easier it will be to see the the small text. The maps were created by a member of the Wikimedia Commons website using various map sources.  This map is free for educational use. The original source of these maps are available for free at http://www.WorldHistoryMaps.infoThe first map starts at 1300 BCE and ends about 1500 CE. They really provide a perspective on how people moved and how territories changed over the 2,800 years.Enjoy.East-Hem_1300bc.jpg

  • #18939

    Chris
    Participant

    East-Hem_1000bc.jpg

  • #18940

    Chris
    Participant

    East-Hem_600bc.jpg

  • #18941

    Chris
    Participant

    East-Hem_550bc.jpg

  • #18942

    Chris
    Participant

    East-Hem_527bc.jpg

  • #18943

    Chris
    Participant

    East-Hem_500bc.jpg

  • #18944

    Chris
    Participant

    East-Hem_400bc.jpg

  • #18945

    Chris
    Participant

    East-Hem_335bc.jpg

  • #18946

    Chris
    Participant

    East-Hem_323bc.jpg

  • #18947

    Chris
    Participant

    East-Hem_300bc.jpg

  • #18948

    Chris
    Participant

    East-Hem_200bc.jpg

  • #18949

    Chris
    Participant

    East-Hem_100bc.jpg

  • #18950

    Chris
    Participant

    East-Hem_050bc.jpg

  • #18951

    Chris
    Participant

    East-Hem_001ad.jpg

  • #18952

    Chris
    Participant

    East-Hem_050ad.jpg

  • #18953

    Chris
    Participant

    East-Hem_100ad.jpg

  • #18954

    Chris
    Participant

    East-Hem_200ad.jpg

  • #18955

    Chris
    Participant

    East-Hem_300ad.jpg

  • #18956

    Chris
    Participant

    East-Hem_400ad.jpg

  • #18957

    Chris
    Participant

    East-Hem_475ad.jpg

  • #18958

    Chris
    Participant

    East-Hem_480ad.jpg

  • #18959

    Chris
    Participant

    East-Hem_486ad.jpg

  • #18960

    Chris
    Participant

    East-Hem_500ad.jpg

  • #18961

    Chris
    Participant

    East-Hem_565ad.jpg

  • #18962

    Chris
    Participant

    East-Hem_600ad.jpg

  • #18963

    Chris
    Participant

    East-Hem_700ad.jpg

  • #18964

    Chris
    Participant

    East-Hem_800ad.jpg

  • #18965

    Chris
    Participant

    East-Hem_900ad.jpg

  • #18966

    Chris
    Participant

    East-Hem_1025ad.jpg

  • #18967

    Chris
    Participant

    East-Hem_1100ad.jpg

  • #18968

    Chris
    Participant

    East-Hem_1200ad.jpg

  • #18969

    Chris
    Participant

    East-Hem_1300ad.jpg

  • #18970

    Chris
    Participant

    East-Hem_1400ad.jpg

  • #18971

    Chris
    Participant

    East-Hem_1500ad.jpg

  • #18972

    Jamie
    Keymaster

    It should be noted that 100BC is not without controversy.  The old view was that there was a Belgic migration or invasion of Britain (accounting for the coins).  These days the prevailing view is that this was the result of trade and mercenary work on the part of the Britons.  Just an FYI.Other than that, great maps!

  • #18973

    Chris
    Participant

    Jamie, can you elaborate? Mercenary work? I can't remember if you mentioned this in the early days of the podcast but I would certainly like to know more.

  • #18974

    Jamie
    Keymaster

    I'm pretty sure I touched on it in the show.  If I didn't, I really dropped the ball.  ;)So the notion is that there was a strong cultural and political relationship between the coastal britons and the coastal continental europeans.  And the Brits would hire themselves out to the continent for military work and then come home with pay, which accounts for the sudden influx of belgic coins (previously it was thought the belgae invaded).  This comports with the later accounts we get of the Romans fighting continentals + british support, and how the tribes on both sides of the channel seem to have worked together to try to put a stop to the Roman advance.

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