Jessie

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This topic contains 9 replies, has 5 voices, and was last updated by  anonymous 5 years, 4 months ago.

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  • #15438

    anonymous
    Participant

    Hi, I'm commonly known as Jessie, and I'm *mumblesanumberthatstartswith30* from Tracy, CA.  That's about an hour from civilization (meaning the greater San Francisco area or the not-as-awesome-but-still-neato Sacramento).  I started off my time in college with the intent to major in history so that I could write a book and then teach California history.  How's that coming along, you ask?  Well, I'm in accounting now, so that plan didn't work out.  I still love history, so I sneak my iPod in to work and listen while I do billing and other really boring stuff.  I've only recently unearthed proof that at least one root in my family tree extends across the pond to Wales, and now to Scotland.  To find out that the family is from someplace other than "the Midwest somewhere" is quite exciting.  This might explain why my gran had such a deep (and sometimes, slightly disturbing) attachment to all British-made things.  Especially East Enders and Prince Charles.  Now that there's a new episode, I'm off to do one of my favorite things -- wind yarn while learning something new! 

  • #17148

    TheBritophile
    Participant

    Hi, I'm commonly known as Jessie, and I'm *mumblesanumberthatstartswith30* from Tracy, CA.  That's about an hour from civilization (meaning the greater San Francisco area or the not-as-awesome-but-still-neato Sacramento).  I started off my time in college with the intent to major in history so that I could write a book and then teach California history.  How's that coming along, you ask?  Well, I'm in accounting now, so that plan didn't work out.  I still love history, so I sneak my iPod in to work and listen while I do billing and other really boring stuff.  I've only recently unearthed proof that at least one root in my family tree extends across the pond to Wales, and now to Scotland.  To find out that the family is from someplace other than "the Midwest somewhere" is quite exciting.  This might explain why my gran had such a deep (and sometimes, slightly disturbing) attachment to all British-made things.  Especially East Enders and Prince Charles.  Now that there's a new episode, I'm off to do one of my favorite things -- wind yarn while learning something new!

    From history to accounting...that's quite a jump! At least there's this podcast to keep you learning new things. I think it's awesome that you wind yarn while listening!

  • #17149

    Jamie
    Keymaster

    You know, there are at least two listeners who wanted to be history teachers and ended up in accounting.  The other is Heather (http://thebritishhistorypodcast.com/forum/index.php?topic=113.0)  What a funny coincidence!  And congratulations on discovering you're part Welsh.  We're a pretty excellent nationality, if I do say so myself.  ;)

  • #17150

    anonymous
    Participant

    No bias there at all, Jamie, right?  ;)And well done pronouncing my name!  I've got family members that still haven't got it right, believe it or not.

  • #17151

    anonymous
    Participant

    Having done some digging around the family tree, I'm over-the-moon thrilled to say that not only have I traced us off of North America on both sides of the family, but I traced one branch way way way back to the 1100s!  Even better (and I'm not sure what it means for that time period), there was a line of Sirs Wrigbowls.A good portion of my maternal line came out of the Yorkshire area (the rest being French and Danish), with a mysterious "Scotland" thrown in for good measure.  No information on WHERE, though.  I rang my mom on Easter to share some of the information I'd found and she happened to be with my Gran.  Gran's been scratching away at the tree for decades, but hasn't given it a go on this new-fangled internet thing.  (We're talkin' old school research for her -- microfilm at the Mormon Temple kind of stuff.)  She was absolutely giddy when my mom relayed information to her.  I totally secured the #1 Grandchild spot.  *fist pump*  On my dad's side, though, I've come to a screeching halt at my great-grandfather.  I've got records that show that he was born in St. Feock, Cornwall, and later living in Penzance with his mother and sister.  But that's it.  The only record I have of his mother has her married name, and no mention whatsoever of his father.  All I have to go on now is old family rumors and logic.  That's my super exciting update, though.  I'm still working on cracking the rest of the tree wide open.  And this weekend is the Scottish Festival at the historic farm my mom works at, and I've been promised that there will be haggis for me to try!

  • #17152

    Chris
    Participant

    Wow! Going back to the 1100's is impressive. How did you find this out….I mean, where and how did you find the records, the paper trail? My family on my mother's side goes back to 1621 in Lazonby, Cumberland and there are even others dating back to 1590 but there isn't a paper connection between them although as far as I can tell there are no other family groups with the same or similar name so it is most likely the later people descended from the earlier people, there's just no church record to say otherwise. So, going back to the 1100's even before the use of surnames is somewhat exciting.I haven't done any family history for years now but I was lucky enough to be contacted by someone who had me in his family tree. I was given the entire thing, some 2,500 names. He was old-school too and used to write everything down on rolls of wallpaper, then pin them up and draw lines between the family members. He could even tell you how they were related  :o  I am used to clicking the mouse a few times and the family tree program tell me how I am related to someone; this guy though was amazing.Haggis is very tasty, the sheep's heart, liver and lungs with just the right amount of pepper is delicious and even better served with neeps and tatties.....perfect  ;)

  • #17153

    anonymous
    Participant

    I'll admit – I totally swiped off of other trees.  The stuff here in the US, I was able to find cencus data to verify and back up branches.  Once I hopped the pond, it got harder, but I latched on to other distant relatives' trees and moved up the line.  Totally cheating, I know.  Now that I have names and dates (give or take a couple of years), it'll be easier to go hunting for birth/marriage/death records.  Right now, I'm using Ancestry.com to build the tree and find records.  I'll export the tree in a few days and nix my membership, and head over to Google for further assistance.  Gotta love that internet.  The amount of records available on Ancestry has increased by leaps and bounds, even over the last couple of years.  I found the passenger list for the the transport ship my grandmother arrived in the US on.  Turns out, after she disembarked in San Francisco, the ship turned back to sea and provided military support during the Korean War (it earned 4 battle stars). I ramble.Finding a paper trail outside of the US is still pretty hard on my end.  But I think, with the information I've borrowed from distant relatives, I'll be able to find records to back up the 'claims'.  I mean, this might require a trip over to Europe, right?  Golly gosh darn!  :D(But seriously, Ancestry.com free trial.  Sit down for an afternoon, enter what you know, and see what happens.  It was madness.  "Okay, I'll stop once I reach the 1700s...  Alright, 1600s and I swear I'm done..."  8 hours later, I'm whooping into the phone and I've completely forgotten to start the Easter ham for dinner.)

  • #17154

    Chris
    Participant

    Family history is pretty addictive when you feel like you are getting somewhere, so forgetting to feed the family or partner is just a minor oversight considering what you have learned with a few clicks of a mouse button :D  And I know what you mean about Ancestry (and other such websites) and how they have improved over the years. I haven't used Ancestry for about six years or more and in that time alone the number of records seems to have increased tenfold and same goes for Find My Past, which used to called 1837 Online. I guess quite a few people just use the free trial, get what they need and go elsewhere; I've done that at least once  ::)Just be careful and make sure you are 100% with every direct ancestor, it would be so frustrating and annoying as hell to know that you have been researching down the wrong line and have to backtrack and start over again. This happened to a friend of mind and had to go back roughly 200 years.  I never relied too heavily on the FamilySearch online records and Ancestry etc. in the earlier days as I noticed several discrepancies, notibly on the LDS site during my research. Luckily for me, after this generous person passed all his info on to me, he said he had painstakingly checked and double checked his research with actual parish records etc. etc. He even spent hours writing letters to family members in the US, Canada and Australia. He has a lot more patience than me, that much I do know.Unless you know for sure that the details you have are correct, have come from reputable sources and have been assessed by your distant relatives as accurate (I am guessing you have a few in UK) then you might not need to travel here, after all it is a long and costly way to go to check some old records. There is the satisfaction, however, that you know the documents you are looking at are the real ones that inform you about your heritage and that, I am sure, is important to anyone. Just a shame you live so far away, crikey I'm only about 350 miles away from family records I could use and I never go there......head down in shame  :-I hope all the records pan out and that you are successful in your research.......the 1100's......this is me still impressed  8)  I would love to go back that far.Just an aside, I've even had a go at indexing one of the UK censuses (can't remember which one now, 1901 I think, this was a long time ago) and heck it is boring but a great way to see how the enumerator spelt people's names and places, many times incorrectly!

  • #17155

    anonymous
    Participant

    Yeah, I've been treating a lot of the trees I've borrowed the same way I treat Wikipedia — not guaranteed accurate but a great jumping-off point for research.  Thankfully what I've found matches up with the good ol' Family Rumor Mill.  (For a long time, “rumor has it that…” was the only thing we had to go on.  Turns out, some of those rumors were true.  Some were complete bull – ie. great-great-great uncle married a *gasp* Chinese woman [scandalous in the 1800s] – but some have panned out, like great-granddad working for the White Star Line.)Do you know if there are any more UK-centric records sites that might have more information?  Ancestry has a lot, but not much in regards to European records.  I'll spot a county registry here and there, but nothing as revealing as the US records.  I think maritime records would crack one line open for me and I can't get my hands on them.  Dagnabbit.Certainly more exciting than anything on TV, that's for sure.  (My husband didn't even notice that I'd forgotten about dinner.  He was in his office gaming the whole time and, per usual, oblivious to time.  I'm making up for it today by making pork verde and plying him with beer.  Close enough!)

  • #17156

    anonymous
    Participant

    Welcome to the BHP, Jessie.  Pretty impressive ancestry tracing! 

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