Genealogy

Home Forums General Discussion Genealogy

This topic contains 25 replies, has 16 voices, and was last updated by  anonymous 3 years, 10 months ago.

  • Author
    Posts
  • #15839

    xXSirenXx07
    Participant

    Many of you may have already decided to research your roots, and that is what led you to Jamie's podcast, and I've asked Jamie where I should post this sort of thing and he recommended here in the General section. I have been doing genealogy now for some friends as well as my own and have come across so many interesting things. My research started with a project for school and a few stories from my grandad when I was growing up that I wanted to know if they were true. I have now been able to trace my ancestors back to King Edward I, William the Conqueror, and many other people known through British history, but that is only one side of my tree. The other is German, as well as tracing back through wives to the English noblility. I am just posting this to see if anyone would be interested in me researching your family history as well. Are you curious about who your ancestors were? I am doing this non-profit because I think that it is important to know who your ancestors were, plus even though they are gone they still have amazing stories to tell. Not all my ancestors came from the famous people in history but some too were hard working people who worked for everything that they had or wanted. Just post a comment below if you are interested, I hope that I could at least help someone out there. Let me know your email and I will send you a message privately so no private info is given out over this. Hope to hear from you all soon. Thank you Jamie also for letting me do this.

  • #19021

    anonymous
    Participant

    I have been tracing my ancestry too (at least on my father's side — my mother's side is from Poland, and I'm not up to that).  My father's mother was English, and I was sure I'd be able to find some hook into the nobility, but so far it has been commoners everywhere I looked.  My father's father's family is Scots/Irish.  My cousin has been able to trace that line back to King David I of Scotland (though not in a terribly well-verified way SFAIK), so from there we get into all the pre-conquest medieval nobility.  Nonetheless, I'm a little disappointed we haven't found our way to any of the Plantagenets at least…

  • #19022

    xXSirenXx07
    Participant

    Hey Suzanne,My family's ancestry also goes back to King David I as well. He would be my 25th great grandfather, and his wife Maud of Chester would be my great grandmother as well. If you would like I could try and help you explore more of your ancestry. My email for you to email me at and anyone else that has any questions is [email protected] or you can message me on here as well. Let me know what help you may need with your ancestry. Great hearing from you.Christina

  • #19023

    anonymous
    Participant

    King David's wife was the Countess of Huntingdon, not Chester.  Maud of Chester was married to David's grandson David, Earl of Huntingdon.  We are descended from David the grandson but not from Maud of Chester (at least not by the one path we've established so far) — we come from his illegitimate daughter Ada!

  • #19024

    xXSirenXx07
    Participant

    Yes, you are right. I have both the man youare speaking of and the man I am speakingof in my family tree, both with a wife namedMaud. I was looking at the grandson I thinkI have both of them marked as the first, but nowhave changed it. The earl of Huntington, withMaud Chester if I have it fixed correctly now, would be my great grandfather, as would hisgrandad I suppose as well lol. So I relate to both. Thank you for pointing out my error in typing.

  • #19025

    Liam
    Participant
  • #19026

    xXSirenXx07
    Participant

    Hi Liam,I sent you an email from my email address as well. Just wanted to let you know to look for it. Great hearing from you.

  • #19027

    Megan
    Participant

    I am an archivist and I frequently assist genealogists as part of my job. I thought I would kick in a few tips:

    • Ancestry.com really is the most user-friendly way to do your genealogy but I always caution people only to save information that is based on an actual source, not just random information gleaned from others' family trees. It's very easy to be led astray in doing so.
    • Familysearch.org duplicates a lot of the information found on Ancestry.com (it also is maintained by the LDS church) but is free. You can get a good start and a lot of free information from familysearch.org.
    • Don't be afraid to contact archives directly to get your source information. Usually, archivists are excited to assist geanies and can provide copies of the primary source records pertinent to your research via email. Research policies vary from archives to archives, though, so sometimes you may be asked to pay a research fee while other times you may not.

    Megan

  • #19028

    xXSirenXx07
    Participant

    Thank you Megan,These are the two sites I use the most. I have found going to an actual source like you have explained is also good for research. Thank you for the hints.

  • #19029

    Tanja
    Participant

    I have been trying to research my genealogy through my father's line, being German. Unfortunately, due to WW1 & 2, alot of archives from many towns and villages in the area my father was born, Gutach im Breisgau in the Black Forest, were destroyed. Managed to trace some of it back to 1300's and my patriarchal line were farmers, with intermarriages with minor... and i mean VERY minor... nobility and back to farming again. However, i did find out on a recent trip ( giving a swab sample from my mouth ), that we are related to a bog body found nearby in Freibug im Breisgau. She was Alemannen, garotted with her hands bound and stabbed, then flung into a bog. The Alemannii were German Celts that lived in that area, neighboring close ties with the Gauls. So, in various stages, my family have always lived in the Black Forest, which explains why there are so many people we are related to, locally. So pretty much, the entire village and half of Freiburg is most likely related to her aswell. I guess someone has to be the peasants :P 

  • #19030

    xXSirenXx07
    Participant
  • #19031

    Rebecca
    Participant

    My sister works at Ancestry. com and is the genealogy nerd in our family. My maternal side goes way, way, way back.  My paternal line is German– and we have managed to trace quite a bit despite WW2 and loss of records.  I married into the Bingham family and just did into their involvement in the Bingham Butter revolution. ;-). So that is why it always comes down to bitter for me!  ;-)  Genealogy is fun and getting easier with all the websites. 

  • #19032

    xXSirenXx07
    Participant

    i agree, it's much easier than it used to be. When I started I think ancestry was the only place around online to really look for stuff at, but now there are a lot of sites now to look at, and making connections overseas to places also makes things easier as well. I only started about 10 or 11 years ago and technology has already come so far. Imagine another 10.

  • #19033

    anonymous
    Participant

    Just curious, how did you find out you're related to a bog body?? That's very cool.I'm wondering if services like 23andMe will start to build a genetic database of existing bog bodies and offer that kind of matching when you use the service.

    I have been trying to research my genealogy through my father's line, being German. Unfortunately, due to WW1 & 2, alot of archives from many towns and villages in the area my father was born, Gutach im Breisgau in the Black Forest, were destroyed. Managed to trace some of it back to 1300's and my patriarchal line were farmers, with intermarriages with minor... and i mean VERY minor... nobility and back to farming again. However, i did find out on a recent trip ( giving a swab sample from my mouth ), that we are related to a bog body found nearby in Freibug im Breisgau. She was Alemannen, garotted with her hands bound and stabbed, then flung into a bog. The Alemannii were German Celts that lived in that area, neighboring close ties with the Gauls. So, in various stages, my family have always lived in the Black Forest, which explains why there are so many people we are related to, locally. So pretty much, the entire village and half of Freiburg is most likely related to her aswell. I guess someone has to be the peasants :P

  • #19034

    Gertrude
    Participant

    I'm jealous of those that can trace family back hundreds and hundreds of years. I'm in the US, and have been able to trace many lines to the pre-colonial era, but we've never quite made the jump back to Europe – we hit a brick wall with the early immigrants. I've got a couple of tantalizing leads and interesting lines that I really want to be true, but can't find confirmation.My brother did a DNA test, and I can't remember the specifics right now, but it did give some interesting info on where that line (patrilineal) came from. Had migration pattern and general facts.

  • #19035

    janlcg
    Participant

    I have been tracing my family on ancestry.com for the last couple of years and am having a great time.  I've found relatives who have shared cool family pictures and stories.  I also think I am related to Jamie. Poor guy.  Oral history on my dad's side was that we were directly descended from Henry Morgan, so of course I loved pirates and pirate stories growing up.  My parents couldn't get me off Pirates of the Caribbean ride in Disneyland; I was really upset when they took away my cutlass (butter knife);  Well, that story turned out not to be true (Morgan married his cousin Elizabeth and had no children).  But I DID find a pirate in the family-- Sir Henry Mainwaring.  So you see, Jamie's theme that myths have kernels of truth in them bears out. 

  • #19036

    Tanja
    Participant

    Our bog body bond:I went to Germany in 2004 for holiday and to see my grandma who always dying. Of something. Anyway, i visited the Uhr museum in Freiburg, the nearest town to my dad's village and there was a volunteer thing going to see how many people currently living in the area could be traced to the people living there up to 4000 years ago. For a laugh, i had my mouth swabbed thinking that, as my family history is so vague , nothing would come of it. Anyway, 6months later, got a letter in German, to which my dad translated as, we share a strand of common DNA with  the remains of a lady who was found in peat locally. She was murdered somewhere before Roman  times. Practically a quarter of those that did the test, share the same strand. Either a family marker, or a marker of the area we slithered out of primordial soup? Makes a great family story... as we all try and hide our webbed feet, scars from having our second head removed and rejoice in the fact that most of us have cheekbones .

  • #19037

    Mick
    Participant

    Assuming standard rates of reproduction and some intermingling, we are probably all descended from one of the ancient greats. It would be hard not to be. But given the problems with English records prior to the 1600's I am amazed by some of the claims about ancestors made here.

  • #19038

    iain
    Participant

    I've got bug for this too. No interesting relatives but there was a name change (to my current surname) about 300 years ago that I knew nothing about.Also my wife and I were born in very different parts of the UK and yet we have ancestors from the same village in England ... fate!

  • #19039

    SusanR
    Participant

    I became interested in genealogy because my paternal grandfather came from Quebec to help after the Halifax Explosion in 1917 and the name is a unusual one in Nova Scotia.  We heard many stories about this family growing up so I started researching in my teens.  One of the funniest things I learned from another woman who is researching our family is that we had a very cool claim to fame...none of us are related to royalty  ;D  She did let me know that we are related to the man who commissioned the Canadian national anthem.  He didn't write it...but he recognized that Canada needed a theme song :)Susan R

  • #19040

    anonymous
    Participant

    I've been doing my family tree for about 10yrs now, I'm lucky that my dad's family are 'gentleman farmers' kind of gentry so I can trace them back to the 1700s and as theyve stayed in the same area and owned (and still owned by other branches of the family) the same land for as long as anyone can remember theyve been easy to trace through wills and land records.There was a rumour that my dad's family was descended to Owain Glyndwr (Glendower if you're English) and I found out the land that my family owned (and still owns) used to be part of his lands but as there are bad records, the mystery of his death, the death of most of his children and the fact that we only really know of his children who married into English aristocracy there is no way of knowing for certain. Although I have been rummaging around a un investigated branch and things are looking hopeful. At least I now know where I get my rebellious attitude from  ;D ;D

  • #19041

    Wingfield
    Participant

    My last name is Curtis.  I have only been able to trace my family back to the mid 1700s in North Carolina.  My DNA matches descendants of a Quaker family that left Derbyshire circa 1680 and settled in Burlington County, New Jersey.  The ancestral village was called Ford in the parish of North Wingfield.

  • #19042

    sharonhimes
    Participant

    Like many in the US I am just pleased to be able to trace family back to the member who first immigrated from England but no farther (at least not yet).  I am most interested in the conditions at the time that made people decide to make that dangerous voyage.I am lucky to have been given the collected genealogy records from several lines of my family.  The Lippincotts first arrived in 1652 and eventually settled in NJ with other Quakers. The Prentice and Bullock families came in the early 1700s and were from also from Darbyshire. One branch were German immigrants in 1700 and my father's ancestors were from somewhere north of London (Whites, not an easy name to trace!)As I am in the Chesapeake Bay area of the US where many early settlers arrived in the 18th century I shouldn't have been so surprised to discover that some of them settled not far from where I live and I am now on the hunt for the home sites and grave markers that might tell more of their stories.

  • #19043

    anonymous
    Participant

    maybe some of you guys would be able to help me with a branch who emigrated to the us in the 1860s/1870s they ended up in Gage County Nebraska and it seems of the two children the son died without children and I think the girl got married but without being able to find a wedding record I can't confirm for certain.as I am over here in the UK I have to rely on online sources but the ones I know of haven't got the record I need to confirm. so anyone  out there who can suggest a way of finding it

  • #19044

    anonymous
    Participant

    I sort of hit the jackpot tonight by downloading my first podcast and finding Jamie's family tree link for Aethelfrith of Deria.  It corresponds to part of the family history we've put together so far.  FWIW, this is one of the lines we have the least amount of information about, but since this side of the family was mucking it up in Scottish/Anglo-Saxon history, we've got quite a bit of of good info going back to various Malcolms, Kenneths, Donalds, Alfred and Aethelred.  It's interesting to see how they fought, intermarried, and fought.  It helps that a distant cousin is a morman and started a lot of the research back in the '60s and if any written records were kept, it was about these guys.  Still, I can't shake the nagging feeling that my DNA has burned itself out and I won't have an entry in the history books.By the way Purplehippy, I don't know if Nebraska was officially a state at the time of your relatives' emigration, but if it was, the US Census may have information.  The census releases their data after about 50 years and I believe it might be online.

  • #19045

    anonymous
    Participant

    Hi AcmesThey were on the US census as they emigrated in the 1860sThere were 4 of them and thankfully they were farmers and I can trace the mum, dad and son until death but the daughter I'm stuck with. No mention of her (with her maiden name) in the census after the 1880s so I think she got married. The only problem is I am 98% sure that I know who she got married to but can't find the record to fully prove it. Her brother died as a bachelor and there is an advert in the local paper I've found online for the sale of his property but no mention of any family.In the late 1960s or early 1970s a granddaughter of the family came back to Wales to see where her family came from and if the son died a bachelor without children then it must be his sister's granddaughter. I've spoken to the local historical society who have said that they could do a search and they only charge $10 but as they are a small society they can only accept cheques or cash as they don't have the capacity to take card payments. As I live in Britain then my British cheques won't be accepted and I'm not sure about sending cash in the international mailI'm having the same problem with tracing my grandfather's cousin who emigrated to Canada in the 1960s but I suppose thats a different problem

You must be logged in to reply to this topic.

jQuery('.testimonials-widget-testimonials17')