Epi: 51 citation – benefits of iron cookware

Home Forums Questions and Feedback Epi: 51 citation – benefits of iron cookware

This topic contains 7 replies, has 4 voices, and was last updated by  Amanda Kennedy 1 year ago.

  • Author
    Posts
  • #16459

    PAMedic
    Participant

    12:30 mark. States iron cookware would have been good as it would provide a fair amount of iron in the diet to help with anemia. This caught my attention, although I'm unsure how to research it for verification. The host may have meant it as an offhand comment, but I'm hoping otherwise. Iron anemia is not uncommon today among some populations (women)  despite our modern high meat diet. Cast iron cookware is popular among preppers because of its durability. In an EotWaWKI event meat availability wrk decrease markedly. So I was wondering. Based on this idle comment:  does case iron cookware increase your iron content & does that iron have a meaningful bio- availability? Thanks in advance ?

  • #20398

    anonymous
    Participant

    If I am not mistaken there's no definitive answer. It seems that it does in some cases but not all. Older Research: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12859709Article on a Vegan Site: http://www.veganhealth.org/articles/ironOne of those "lovely" myths debunked posts with no sources or citations (Entry 5): http://www.thekitchn.com/5-myths-of-cast-iron-cookware-206831

  • #20399

    anonymous
    Participant

    I think it is reasonable to conclude some iron absorption, but not enough to manage anemia.  The anemia from menses or malnutrition or parasites requires pharmacologic dosing and the amounts noted are small.  The theory of absorption of minerals from cookware is reasonable and objectively noted.  A simple search on PubMed shows a few references including the one noted.  A good one noted meaningful increase in hemoglobin in using soapstone.  Nickel is known to be absorbed from stainless steel cookware under acid conditions.  This could have been a meaningful source of iron, and there is some bioavailability, but i am not convinced it is enough to manage anemia.  In modern times we routinely find women anemic despite plentiful food sources of iron. 

  • #20400

    PAMedic
    Participant

    I think it is reasonable to conclude some iron absorption, but not enough to manage anemia.  The anemia from menses or malnutrition or parasites requires pharmacologic dosing and the amounts noted are small.  The theory of absorption of minerals from cookware is reasonable and objectively noted.  A simple search on PubMed shows a few references including the one noted.  A good one noted meaningful increase in hemoglobin in using soapstone.  Nickel is known to be absorbed from stainless steel cookware under acid conditions.  This could have been a meaningful source of iron, and there is some bioavailability, but i am not convinced it is enough to manage anemia.  In modern times we routinely find women anemic despite plentiful food sources of iron.

    Agreed however clearly it is enough to make a difference in serum levels even with parasites, which I hope to avoid all days. If a modern person in te western world is anemic it is through willful mal-nutrition. I'm less concerned with today & more concerned with the tomorrows. I well be expanding my cast iron cooking equipement the three pans I have being clearly not enough.

  • #20401

    Jamie
    Keymaster

    I believe that particular comment came from Cameron's “Anglo Saxon Medicine”, if that helps at all.  :)

  • #20402

    anonymous
    Participant

    If I am not mistaken there's no definitive answer. It seems that it does in some cases but not all. Older Research: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12859709Article on a Vegan Site: http://www.veganhealth.org/articles/ironOne of those "lovely" myths debunked posts with no sources or citations (Entry 5): http://www.thekitchn.com/5-myths-of-cast-iron-cookware-206831

    As the citationless link that Tiago Souza gave us points out, it will vary depending on the degree that the pan is "seasoned" (I would imagine pans 1200 years ago would be quite valuable, handed down between generations, and not accustomed to harsh detergents or dishwashers, so we can probably assume they're fairly well seasoned) and also the acidity of the food.  This makes a fair amount of sense, although I imagine that most of the staple diet wasn't particularly acidic.  Its quite possible that the "workaround" was that the poor just _were_ quite anaemic - and probably had a number of other nutritional deficiencies to boot.  Jamie, is your forensic pathologist friend still a listener?  I doubt anaemia would show up in bone structure but some other nutritional deficiencies might.  Just the average size of skeletons might give an indicator, although I suspect that that is partially genetic.

  • #20403

    anonymous
    Participant

    Anemia would not show up in the bone structure.  Deficiencies of vitamin D would.  Vitamin C deficiency could manifest in teeth and gum issues.  Otzi (the frozen, mummified, 5300 year old, Austrian) gives us a glimpse into some of the health issues that someone even in the first millennia would experience.  Calorie intake and protein availability does influence size and muscle mass.  Infectious diseases being the most common cause of morbidity and mortality.  Tuberculous will infect the bones, as an example.  Traumatic injuries are obvious in the bones. Heavy metals used in medicine (arsenic)or from smelting/working metals will show upon bones too.  Bones can really tell us a lot.

  • #29271

    Amanda Kennedy
    Participant

    I have a condition that can cause an excess of iron to build up, so i avoid iron sources, but my doctor advised me that the amount of iron I would get from iron cookware was so minimal as to be negligible.

You must be logged in to reply to this topic.

jQuery('.testimonials-widget-testimonials17')