British Nationality

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This topic contains 24 replies, has 13 voices, and was last updated by  Mary Bellomo 7 months, 3 weeks ago.

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  • #16248

    Anonymous

                            Feel Free to tell the Group your Nationality(s).  For my part, I'm English, Welsh, Scottish, Irish, German, French, Polish, Norweigen, and Pomerianian. (Baltic Tribe, Not Fuzzy Dogs.) Also, (as a joke) Anerondac Chair and Sasquatch.  ;D   

  • #20088

    ScottFM
    Participant

    I'm American. My family came from England to North America in 1695, many eventually settled into the area that would come to be known as Connecticut. The family are the Coles, they lived in Sterling. Another branch of the family is from Scotland, coming to the US in the 1800s. Going back further I found two ancestors from the time of Elizabeth I, one is buried in Peterborough and the other near Ipswich. Small world incident is that I lived, for several years, near those towns in East Anglia during the early 1980's. Unlike a lot of people who do their genealogy, I have uncovered no links to royalty or nobility. Closest I got was that one of my Italian ancestors was given a land grant for fighting with Garibaldi.

  • #20089

    anonymous
    Participant

    English with Welsh ancestry and like ScottFM I can't find any genealogical links to royalty or anyone famous. Seems we were a mix of stonemasons, carpenters and scriveners.

  • #20090

    Anonymous

    I just remembered something.My Great Great-Grand Mother last name was Johnson. She was Norweigian, and there is a record of Johnson's in the 1400 Century! So, not 1066, which, sadly, means were probaly not Related to Harald Harada. 

  • #20091

    JenRoy
    Participant

    I am a dual British/American citizen. My mom is from Coatbridge, near Glasgow. My gram's side is from Glasgow as far back as we can tell. Gramp's side is all Rothesay and Inverness, from what I can gather. I believe Gram has a bit of English in her because her ancestor names include Shawcross, Blades, and Wilson. We all have the light brown hair and blue eyes of that region, and occasionally a ginger pops up in my family on that side. As for my father's side, I am all American there. On both his mom's side and his dad's side I qualify as a DAR.  His mother's side goes back to William Davis who came here from Wales in the 1660's, about whom a book was written, so I know that family geneology well. His dad's side seems to originate with a pair of brothers in England who stole a waist coat (in the 1750's) on purpose so they would get free passage to America as thieves. Strangely, that sounds very much like dad's dad's side of the family.  Dad's side has mostly Welsh and English, also mostly horrible alcoholics. There is but a smattering of German (one). I am tracing all of his line back to the immigrants to America. All come here before the 1800's, as far as I have been able to find out. 98% of them were Welsh and English. I am not sure I could be more British American than that. 

  • #20092

    anonymous
    Participant

    I am an American and my ancestors, as far as I can tell, were all here pre-Revolution. They were mainly English and Scottish, but there is also some Welsh, Scot-Irish, Swedish, German, and French thrown in there as well. My 9th great grandfather was George Ross, a younger son of David Ross, who was chief of Clan Ross, and was a descendant of the Plantagenet's. George was taken prisoner at Dunbar, survived the march to Durham, and was shipped off to Connecticut as an indentured servant. Following his servitude, he became a founding father of New Haven, but eventually settled in Elizabethtown, NJ.

  • #20093

    anonymous
    Participant

    A quick note Scott, as a student of the State Historian Walter Woodward some years ago, I can assure you that by the 1690s Connecticut was already known as such and a well established colony. Abandoned by the competing Massachusetts and Plymouth governments after the two heavily antagonized the local natives, settlers in Connecticut inherited a brutal (and eventually, genocidal) war against the Pequots in the 1630s that led directly to its “independence” from Massachusetts Bay and Plymouth Plantation both culturally and politically :). Early Connecticut history is very rich in this regard, and yet it's generally left unmentioned and forgotten even in my hometown of Glastonbury (then a part of Wethersfield, where the war arguably began).I'm an American (New Englander), but my ancestry's pretty much split down the Irish sides (my nana and granny) and the English sides (grandad and grandfather).The Irish are pretty hard to pin down. The Murphys came from Cork to Springfield, MA in the 1880s and past that all records are lost or nonexistant. I don't even know where the O'Neills (with two L's!) are from. I'd assume Ulster given the name, but I don't know. I'm told I'm distantly related to old Niall, though :). The English side came really early. I have an indentured servant ancestor who came over on the Mayflower. I also know I'm directly related to Mary Towne Eastey (famous Rebecca Nurse's sister), both of whom were executed for witchcraft in Salem by hanging. What's crazy is, even though my dad's from Texas and my mom's from southern Connecticut, I live in Salem now by total chance. I guess ancestry was calling? ;)

  • #20094

    anonymous
    Participant

    I'm a Welsh person (800yrs plus)with a little help from Scottish, via Ireland, and a Scandinavian surname. Also a slight diversion of a gr gr grandad from Birkenhead

  • #20095

    anonymous
    Participant

    I am a 13th generation American. My father's family, the Littles, came from England in 1649 and settled in Newburyport, MA. We actually have a genealogy compiled in the 1880's show how all the different lines had descended from George And Alice Little. A farm owned by one of their sons still exists in Newbury and, until given to local historical society in the 90's, was the oldest farm continuously owned by a single family in the US. Apparently the people who did the geology tried to research George Little and Alice Poore's ancestry in England but where only able to find out that Alice's family had lived in one of the shanty homes that lined the London bridge. Guess that is why they struck out for the New World.My mother's family, Beard's, were also from England and came over in the early 1800's. They were whalers in the New Bedford, MA area.

  • #20096

    anonymous
    Participant

    My Passports say Australian/British but scratch the surface and it's Irish Catholic/Eastern European Jew.

  • #20097

    CharlieBxox
    Participant

    I'm English but I have Welsh, Scottish and Channel Island blood all mixed in. Sadly though I am not completely British, as my father's side of the family were 4th or 5th generation migrants from France to Jersey. These Frenchies gave me my surname, Blampied, which comes from the French meaning White-Foot, which was a tribe that invaded Northern France. Pretty awesome huh?! And yes.. My favourite Avenger is Thor  ???

  • #20098

    anonymous
    Participant

    i'm an american.on my mother's side i am on Olmsted, tracing back to James Olmsted who emigrated from Essex to Boston in 1632 and later founded Hartford.

  • #20099

    anonymous
    Participant

    I'm Canadian, living in Toronto. Immigrated from South Africa, where my family has been for five generations. So I don't identify with any European country really, being a mix of German, English, French, Indian and Zulu. My education in British history was seriously deficient, so the BHP is a steep learning curve.

  • #20100

    anonymous
    Participant

    What about all of the above.  Probably applies to a lot of USA folks, particularly those from the South.

  • #20101

    Mother Moon
    Participant

    My family is Welsh, English and Scottish. The emigrated about a Century ago. It's apparently too late to take it back.

  • #20102

    Pugzilla66
    Participant

    English, Scottish, Irish, mosquito Native American, and a dash of German to shake things up a bit. 

  • #20103

    Heather
    Participant

    Born and bred in the North West of England. My family are Lancashire going back at least 400 years (as far as one of my cousins has traced). No diversity here!I do, however, have an interesting ancestor. The suffragette Edith Rigby is in our family line - she was imprisoned seven times, force fed under protest and is on an embroidery in the Museum of London for surviving the hunger strikes. After that, she founded a school for underprivileged women and girls and was, amongst other things, the first woman in Preston to ride a bicycle...

  • #20104

    Silme
    Participant

    On my mother's side I seem to be pure Forest Finn, which is a tribe from Finland, part of which emigrated (by foot) in the 1500s – we've traced the family tree on that side back to Finland and know what the “ur-homestead” is. On my father's side it is somewhat more interesting (to me, that is, because I know less) – on the islands off the far west coast of Norway, in the areas that were among the first to be populated as the ice withdrew, is where my father's family call home. At a glance there is a long family tree, with known continuous settlement (can be presumed to be family) on our little rock at least back to the 1300s, and traces of stone age settlements have been found. So Norwegian, with an exception? But then we started poking, my half-sister and I. And it turns out that many of the villages around consisted mostly of Scots – viking slaves that had bought themself freedom, that is. And there has been much intermarriage with those villages, because, to paraphrase Jamie – they'd be getting some rather unfortunate children if not. The other thing came later, a lovely little story my father used to tell me of two Scottish sisters that drifted across in an open boat during a storm, having rowed across to rescue a sheep stuck on a rock shelf just as the squall came in. They both stayed and married and one of them was my ancestress, according to my father. I loved the story as a child, as a young adult I figured it was a tall tale (he was a sailor and fisherman, they tell tall tales out of habit), but a few years back the story of the sisters was confirmed to me by other, more trustworthy sources, but I haven't yet found out if the part that one of them married into my bloodline is true or where exactly they came from. I do know they were islanders with sheep, much like my own family. So, genetically I Finnish/Norwegian/Scottish, probably in that order. Nowadays I claim to be Swedish despite my passport saying otherwise :)

  • #20105

    anonymous
    Participant

    I have really been working the genealogy lately, and have been astounded as to from where my family(s) come.My surname is from a little town in the Rhine river valley called Bad Bergzaben.  That family came to the US through New Orleans about 1836. His mother's branch is most definitely Irish.  I can trace it back to the 17th Century in Wicklow (spelling?).Mom's side originally was from an area about 25 miles away from Dad's side, though on the Alsace plateau.  However, before they came to the Colonies (in 1700), they spent a generation in England.  And her mother's side I can trace back to the middle 17th century to Bermuda.  I haven't yet traced it to Europe, but the root name is either Welsh or Manx.

  • #20106

    gartut
    Participant

    My genealogy is still being researched but i have got back to 1738 on my mothers side, and 1770 in my fathers side. My mothers side was really hard to track as they were narrow-boat families during the industrialization of the West Midlands, so they were everywhere. My Fathers side is a bit of a mess too. They originally came from Wigston in Leicester. They then moved from Wigston to Barry for the construction of the Coal port, which eventually became the biggest coal port in the world. So I guess I am mostly english. But I love the Welsh heritage and i like to call myself British.   

  • #20107

    anonymous
    Participant

    I'm an American. My heritage is mainly English, but with some Irish, French, Cherokee, and German mixed in.I've done a lot of research into my dad's family history. On my mothers side I know much less as the direct line ends with an Irishman on the run from the law and who disappears from many records as if he didn't exist in the mid-Nineteenth Century.My father's side though I've been able to trace back to their origins (before moving to the American colonies at least) in Canterbury, England. In 1635 the first of this side of my family moved to the new Virginia Colony and settled in New Kent. I'm not entirely certain when the family, or part of it, moved to North Carolina. However, by the time of the American Revolution, all men of age had joined the state's militia forces to fight against the British. Planning on eventually making it out to merry-ol' England in order to see the land many of my ancestors came from.

  • #20108

    Angelique
    Participant

    I'd say 'Other,' although there is some Irish on my mother's side. I'm mostly Metis, French, Austrian and American. The only really traceable ancestry is my grandmother's line, which can be traced back to the early 1600's when Francois, born in Normandy, arrived in Canada in 1636, married a middle-schooler and was witness to the first recorded Canadian marriage contract – and, I think, double wedding.

  • #20109

    Pobble99
    Participant

    I'm a Devonshire dumpling. There are a few infiltrations from Kent, possibly some Spanish pillagers, but essentially a dumpling  :)

  • #20110

    anonymous
    Participant

    While I am an American (specifically a Texan), my roots are English, Irish, Scottish, and Dutch with a little Cherokee and Choctaw native american thrown in for good measure.

  • #30431

    Mary Bellomo
    Participant

    American – my mother’s side has been in the U.S. since before the revolution. Roots are in England, Ireland, Norway, Denmark, and Germany.

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