British History Maps

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This topic contains 22 replies, has 5 voices, and was last updated by  drewster81 5 years, 1 month ago.

  • Author
    Posts
  • #15450

    jalpert911
    Participant

    These are some useful maps I use when listening to the podcast!

  • #17256

    jalpert911
    Participant

    At British Isles at 802 AD, 1300 AD, and other times

  • #17257

    jalpert911
    Participant

    England at 60 Ad, 400 AD, and 410 AD

  • #17258

    Jamie
    Keymaster

    These are great!  Thanks for sharing them with us.  :)And just so everyone knows, if you click on the image you'll get a larger version for you to look at. 

  • #17259

    Chris
    Participant

    These maps are great  :)It helps with the podcasts and generally just figuring out where every tribe and place is relation to one another.

  • #17260

    jalpert911
    Participant

    England

  • #17261

    jalpert911
    Participant

    England

  • #17262

    jalpert911
    Participant

    Ireland & Europe

  • #17263

    jalpert911
    Participant

    Scotland

  • #17264

    jalpert911
    Participant

    Ireland (Later)

  • #17265

    jalpert911
    Participant

    Ireland

  • #17266

    jalpert911
    Participant

    England & Wales before and after 1832

  • #17267

    jalpert911
    Participant

    England & Wales January, 1643 & May, 1643

  • #17268

    jalpert911
    Participant

    England

  • #17269

    jalpert911
    Participant

    England and France

  • #17270

    jalpert911
    Participant

    England

  • #17271

    jalpert911
    Participant

    England

  • #17272

    jalpert911
    Participant

    Other

  • #17273

    Chris
    Participant

    These are excellent, what are your sources? Just an observation but ALL of the maps from the Ireland (Later) post are very small, about 150x166, and don't enlarge to be able to see what's on them. Just wondered if you knew this  ;)

  • #17274

    drewster81
    Participant

    I'd like to bring your attention to a map known as the Tabula Peutingeriana.  It is a copy of a map of the cursus publicum, the Roman road network.  It's absolutely incredible, in general, as it features everywhere from the Ganges on over to Ireland.  Now, obviously, the particular section we're the most interested in is at the left. The file size is pretty massive and I can't post it here, so head on over to this wikipedia page to learn about it's history and see the document in super-close-up. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tabula_PeutingerianaAlso, here's a website where it is divided into sections.  Enjoy. :)http://www.euratlas.net/cartogra/peutinger/

  • #17275

    anonymous
    Participant

    Thank you for posting these.  They're dead useful.

  • #17276

    Chris
    Participant

    Drew, I had heard of the Tabula Peutingeriana what seems like quite a long time ago but have never seen it before. It impressive. Just imagine the patience required to create that under the conditions and using the tools they had then. I didn't think it was possible to draw such a map but now I have seen it I understand that it is not done in the conventional sense, none of the land masses are even remotely familiar in size and shape.

  • #17277

    drewster81
    Participant

    Oh yeah, it's totally distended.  It's a neat impression of how the Roman mind conceived the world.  The visual reach was about how far the road was, not the actual size of the landmass.  The ubiquitous “Thule” makes an appearance as well.  I love seeing how extensive the road network was even in Britain.  One of these days, I'll do a little walk along any surviving ones.  (I know that some are now major highways in the country, like Fosse Way.

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