The Heptarchy Family Tree (+ Normans)

In response to numerous requests, I have created a family tree for the Heptarchy. It began just covering those houses, but now it has stretched to include the Norman period. This is a work in progress and will be updated as time allows.

Please let me know if you have any suggestions or requests!

Click Here for a full sized version... make sure you zoom in when you open it.

Click for a full sized view

31 Comments

    1. What part of “It’s a work in progress” didn’t you understand? This person has worked hard on this and l, for one appreciate the effort.

      1. I don’t think it was a dig at Jamie – I think he’s genuinely saying he loves that one branch actually starts with Woden (I didn’t get the impression he’s bitching about the ??? – that’s pretty standard for the time, and all the work in the world isn’t going to fill the female gaps cause no one bothered to record them). It’s funny cause Woden is a god (Odin in Norse) and the likelihood of anyone *actually* being descended from Woden is silly, but they all believed it then and it’s neat that Jamie actually decided to toss Woden in there as an ancestor. You seem to be getting worked up over nothing – the dude just liked seeing a mythical god on a family tree, god forbid he get a kick out of it apparently!

      1. This would also be super helpful when we get to the Wars of the Roses, maybe with nicknames added. Every single son in every generation on both side seems to have named his children Richard, Edward and Henry. I listened to the Norman History podcast for a while, but I had to give up until I could have a visual guide to go with it – there’s approximately 4000 Roberts!

        1. That’s a great idea, because you’re absolutely right about the sheer nightmare of how the nobles were naming their kids during that era. It’s even worse than the flood of AEthels in the middle ages.

        2. Jamie – I second that, especially when they start out with one name, and then when they get a title, they’re known by a different name. It turns into Who’s On First really fast.

      2. Is there any chance of purchasing this as a wall chart…It would great and cause hours of discussion in our family>>>…

        1. I’ve been talking with Kat Moss about converting this into something more artistic. We’ll see. It’s on the backburner right now because it’ll be a huge project if we do that. :)

  1. Could you do a podcast on the meaning/ history of the various names, if there is any information available? History, genealogy, language, all rolled into one — right up your tree, so to speak.

    Thank you for your wonderful work. I just became a member.

  2. Jamie, this is great. I have done a pretty extensive family tree of my own family and can now tie into this information and trace my own lineage to Woden. Pretty cool, heh. I don’t suppose you want to make it available in a Gedcom file….

  3. I can’t imagine how much research and work went into this, Jamie! Thank you so much for sharing your passion with us!

  4. This is truly an amazing piece of work Jamie. I don’t think something as in-depth as this exists anywhere else. Must be hard to know where to stop, because links must keep coming. How you put this together would be a members podcast in it’s own right. *hint hint*

    I’d love to see a Welsh & Scots tree too. I’m not asking you to do that, coz I realise this is already a full on piece of work. But if you know of something similar, could you share that?

  5. This is a thing of beauty. And super helpful for me since I can track my ancestry back to some of these really early folks, (We’re all probably descended from these guys, we just don’t all have the paperwork!)

  6. Do you have some kind of text file or json file? I need some way to practice data visualization and I’ve been listening to this podcast a lot

  7. This is fascinating. I could read this for hours. Your Podcast inspired me to look further into my own origins. I was born in England in Chatham in Kent. My father’s ancestors are from Gloucestershire, mostly laborers from around Stroud. My mother’s family are South Eastern English. They are a family that has been in and around London for as long as there has been one. It turns out my deepest ancestor pledged allegiance to Malcom the 1st of Scotland and ended up as the gentry of the Isle of Wight. So there you go, even us scrubs can claim some of this history as our own. Yeah my DNA shows I truly am a Kentish man, in all it’s Danish, Frisian and British complexity.

  8. Great work! Very comprehensive. If there was some way to connect Saint Margaret of Scotland, mother of Edith/Matilda (every girl was Matilda for awhile!) who married King Henry I, as being the daughter of Edward the Exile, wayyyy over on the chart, that would be awesome. Henry I married Matilda in order to further connect the Norman dynasty with the ancient English royal line- his mother Queen Matilda having been descended from Alfred the Great.

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