Re: Re: When did the British landscape acquire its modern look, take II

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#18578

Mick
Participant

Hello. I have spent a bit of time mooching around the Welsh borders in particular trying to make sense of the landscapes so for what it is worth…I don't think that there was a single transitional period for the landscape. More land was probably cleared in the neolithic and in particular the bronze age than people imagine. For instance large parts of Cornwall were already being farmed then and the landscape there is similar. Around the coast, borders and lowlands in Wales there are plenty of signs of fairly dense early habitation. Less so in the mountainous interior but even there most of the forestry is modern. In short, the human landscape is ancient. Genuine original woodland with long standing growth of indigenous species is comparatively rare. Notwithstanding, on wolves, it appears that the English King Athelstan rec'd 300 wolf skins every years from Hywel Dda of Wales; that would have been in the mid 900's. A.D. Liam, the forests referred to in the forest laws refers to areas where the hunting was reserved for the king. It doesn't mean that they were forests in the sense of being densely wooded.

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