Re: Re: When did the British landscape acquire its modern look, take II

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#18573

anonymous
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I suppose this may depend on what your idea of “wilderness” is.To my British mind, there are many parts of these islands that do qualify as wilderness.  Tent on my back, I've travelled through many areas spending days totally remote from civilisation.  In Wales there are the Brecon Beacons (used for selection and survival training of the SAS) and Snowdonia.  The Scottish Highlands have vast areas of remote wilderness and England is well served between the Peak and Lakes Districts, not to mention places like Dartmoor.All of these areas are predominantly moorland and you are right that after the trees were felled, mosses took over and made the soil too acidic for young trees to gain a foothold, not to mention exposure to the strong winds without the shelter of mature trees around them.As with any country with an established agricultural heritage, accessible land has long been developed and exploited.  There are plough furrows still visible in some areas that date back many thousands of years so that gives an idea of how long this has been going on.  It's the areas that are either too barren or too difficult terrain that now remain as wilderness but we do have plenty of these.We do still have large forested areas, some natural and some plantation.  These are nothing to compare with Scandinavia or parts of North America though.

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