311 – Team Edward

King Edgar the Peaceable was buried at Glastonbury in 975. But weirdly that isn’t the end of his story. William of Malmesbury tells us that nearly a century later, in 1053, the Abbot Ailward re-opened the King’s tomb. Malmsbury doesn’t tell us WHY the monk opened the grave, so I suppose we can just assume [...]

310 – Political Theater

Human beings can’t really be summed up in a nickname. Usually we are more complicated than a word or two. And sometimes, the nickname just doesn’t reflect reality. If you take  Edward the Elder, for example, the name probably conjures up an image of Gandalf. But Edward was only in his early 50’s when he [...]

309 – Size Doesn’t Matter (until it does)

You would think that someone named Edgar the Peaceable enjoyed a good reputation. But the closer you look, the more things start to look...off. And if you look closer than that, you start to get the sense that maybe things WERE off. <a href="http://www.thebritishhistorypodcast.com/show-your-support" rel="payment">Support the Show</a>

308 – A Thirst for Reform

Across the North Sea, in Scandinavia, a man named Harald Greycloak was struggling for dominance in the region.  He wasn’t just any man, he was a son of Erik Bloodaxe and Gunnhilde. And his fight brought him into direct conflict with King Haakon.

304 – A Kingdom Divided

Northumbria was always the hot mess of the heptarchy. There are a few exceptions where they manage to pull it together long enough to produce something important, like Bede, or when Leeds United won the premiership in 1991. But generally, it’s a bit of a shitshow.  Sort of like Leeds United.

303 – Eric Bloodaxe

We can probably assume that Harald Fairhair, the King of Norway, had fantastic hair. It was either big, or really long, or super glossy, and it was almost definitely blonde. But it wasn’t the only trait he was known for. Harald Fairhair was also  known for getting around... and around… and around. According to records, [...]